A Re-Recap

A re-recap, if you will.

magnacarta

Part 2, summarizing points 6-10 of our Municipal Governance Election Manual. (Re-recap, The Prequel, points 1-5 is here.)

6) Civic engagement. It’s more than just voting every 4 years. It’s more than paying taxes. It’s about encouraging participation. It’s about listening to disparate voices beyond those on AM talk radio and in Tim Horton’s line-ups. It’s about opening up decision making beyond just at election day.

7) Civic audacity. Cities, communities, neighbourhoods, streets aren’t built or created on a foundation of no. Aiming higher will yield better results than lowering expectations and demanding little. We need a sense of daring in the face of things that aren’t working. Accepting a broken status quo because that’s the way things have always been done is the surest way to perpetuate both a sense of decline as well as decline itself.

reachforthesky

8) Social Justice. If you’re not interested in working for a city that improves the lives and opportunities of everyone living in it, your motives for running for municipal office are suspect. A city pockmarked by inequity, poverty and the daily grind of precariousness is not a place utilizing its greatest resource: the people choosing to live there. Social justice cannot be an abstraction, delivered with an empty slogan. It must be the cornerstone – the policy initiative core — of any municipal politician’s campaign platform.

9) Business Plan. Live, play, work. A healthy city must provide all those opportunities for all its residents. None of the three can function properly if any of them aren’t.

Like so many other cities in developed nations, Toronto is undergoing a fundamental workplace change. The manufacturing base has collapsed. Fortunately, the local economy is a diverse one with a firm foothold in both the information and service sectors.

With limited tools at their disposal, municipal politicians must make the best of what they have. Their business strategy has to be more than just promising low taxes, however. They must lay out ideas how to make the city a more attractive place to not only invest in but to work in. Good business instincts aren’t exclusively about saving money.

civicresponsiblity

10) Rave Don’t Rage. In many ways, this one’s just a summary of our summary. Using elements of the previous 9 points, our local representatives have to endeavour to make the city sing. We hear talk of wanting to attract the best talent in all walks of life to the city, the best and the brightest, the most innovative and hardest working. You do that by building a city that nobody could imagine living anywhere but there. A place people believe will best provide the necessary conditions for them to flourish, to find fulfilling relationships, raise a family, grow old in.

The city entices because it is enticing.

You want a city people want to live in not one they wind up living in reluctantly, because they have to. In order to do that, you have to show the place a little love, endeavour to do the impossible, stop short-changing it. You need to turn the level of expectation up to 11.

rave

sing-songly submitted by Cityslikr

2 Responses to A Re-Recap

  1. Sonny says:

    Ford the narcissist branched beyond talk radio to do the Kimmel Show where he gets to talk about himself rather than promote Toronto OR answer tough questions…

    http://www.nowtoronto.com/news/story.cfm?content=196971

  2. Simon Says says:

    “Live, play, work. A healthy city must provide all those opportunities for all its residents. None of the three can function properly if any of them aren’t.”

    You realize that congestion is a problem of people who do not live in TO but commute to work in TO.

    I have yet to meet a TTC worker, a police officer and EMS that live in Toronto. They all live far outside the city (Guelph, Aurora, Pickering). Why not make residency a part of employment for city service workers?

    City council works to make business want to leave the city, not set up shop in the city. The constant NIMBYism and nanny stating drive business out of the city.

    The city botched the food cart program and will most likely botch food truck licensing.

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