On The Road To Nanjing

May 16, 2010

Reluctantly leaving Shanghai behind us, we set off inland for Nanjing, twice the nation’s capital. Perhaps the exquisite trains and subways had spoiled us but the bus ride was pretty well unbearable. Long, bumpy, jolting. It’s a sad fact that rather than see western car culture as the blight on society that it is, China has embraced it, buying into the lethal notion of car as status. Traffic in these parts is truly awful, making us homesick for the relative pastoral quality of our roads and highways.

It is the better part of a five hour trip and once I’ve quelled an unusual wave of nausea due to the bouncing and swerving and honking and smoggy air, I begin to take in the surroundings. Shanghai extends for fucking ever. We are still fully urban 3 hours into the trip. It goes on and on and on and on.

As I look closer, I realize entirely new cities are being built on either side of the freeway. Blocks of high rises, some 10-15 St. Jamestowns in number, some other more townhouse like low rises, roads, highways, major infrastructure rising up at breakneck speed for miles on end. Empty land is being gobbled up. Older settlements have been levelled or built around. New communities (most of which are surprisingly green and treed throughout) springing up relentlessly.

A passing billboard catches my attention. Export Processing Zones. In amongst these communities and cities, I begin to spot factories and plants (of the very non-green type) dotting the landscape or, in some cases, dominating it. Hey, look! There’s a Makita Tools site. Clearly what we are witnessing is the making of modern company towns right before our very eyes.

Moreoever, we are travelling through the destination of lost, well paying North America manufacturing jobs. That is not a condemnation of China (in case anyone’s listening in.) This is simply the outcome of the deal made by our titans of industry and signed on by us twenty years or so ago, in return for access to cheap trinkets and gewgaws. Here lies the remains of our healthy middle class, may it R.I.P.

What boggles the mind upon further reflection is that we’ve really learned nothing from this whole situation. We’ve applauded the Chinese for reaching out and embracing western style, free market capitalism while choosing to ignore the fact that the state, in fact, still holds a mighty heavy hand on the economic tiller of the nation. When the global economic meltdown occurred nearly 2 years ago now, fuelled by our laissez-faire attitude to financial regulation, lack of government oversight and a blind zeal for the market knows best thinking, it was China that weathered the storm more stably, didn’t dip as deeply and has come out the other end more vigorously.

Us? We stood by and watched as our governments came to the rescue of short-sighted failed businesses and bailed out greedy, reckless industries, saving our entire economic system from yet another cataclysmic collapse and then immediately upon spotting a possible turnaround started demanding that they step back, pay their bills and allow everything to go back to normal. No harm, no foul. Because remember, as St. Ronnie told us: government is the problem not the solution.

All the while, China marches forward, continuing to build its cities.

— also shamefully submitted by Cityslikr