Capital Report III

May 29, 2014

washingtondc

Clearly Pierre L’Enfant set about designing the layout of this nation’s capital in the late 18th-century with cyclists in mind. Take it from someone who has made his way around Washington by all sorts of modes, biking in D.C. is the way to go.

When the city introduced its bike share program back in the fall of 2010, it did so with a certain degree of gusto. It now has more than 300 stations and 2500+ bikes in use. Compare that with Toronto’s BIXI or whatever it’s called now and its 80 stations and a 1000 bikes. While a far cry for the Velib in Paris (1230 stations, 14,000+ bikes), finding a place to grab and drop off a ride is relatively easy. Even during a busy Memorial Day long weekend, we found ourselves bikeless only on a couple of occasions and not for very long.

capitalbikeshare

And, oh the places I have seen by bike this week! Neighbourhoods and off the beaten track sites that might have otherwise remained unseen. Would I have hopped onto the Metro to go see the grave of John Philip Sousa buried in the Congressional Cemetery? No. But by bike? Why not. Who knows the places we might discover along the way? The ‘Historic Capital Hill’ neighbourhood, in fact.

The city is still catching up in terms of bike lanes. There are a fair amount but you get no sense of a network yet. Yet. The big difference between riding here and in Toronto is the politeness of the drivers. Maybe it’s all that southern hospitality but drivers don’t really seem to mind sharing the road with cyclists.

Washington on foot is an undertaking. Pleasant to walk but there are significant distances between monuments and museums. Travelling by Metro is fast but you can miss some of the more quiet asides.

jpsousa

Biking in D.C. is the way to go. You might almost call it, capital! (But you wouldn’t because that’s British and people are still touchy about having their White House burned down.)

pip-piply submitted Cityslikr


Capital Report II

May 27, 2014

washingtondc

Aspirational.

It’s difficult comparing the actual centre of the universe to the in its mind only version (although I have yet to meet that mythical being who really locates Toronto at that point in their cosmology). Washington embraces its capital-ness with gusto. This is what we’re about, folks. This is US.

Yes. The hypocrisy at its core is not lost on me. Thomas “All Men Are Created Equal” Jefferson was a slave owner. The grinding poverty existing mere blocks from the White House. Miles and miles of museums dedicated to science and knowledge in a country filled by climate change skeptics and creationists.

Still.

Aspiration.

Washington flaunts its ideals even if it doesn’t always live by them.

mlkmonument

While I’ll leave it to Americans to wrassle with the implications of that, I still love visiting the city those ideals built. There’s always the possibility some of them may rub off.

hopefully submitted  by Cityslikr


Capital Report I

May 25, 2014

washingtondc

Ha Ha.

I bet no one’s ever called anything they’ve written about Washington ‘Capital Report ‘ before. There’s just something about this place that fills the head with creative thoughts.

Anyhoo…

Connect the airport to the city with easy, accessible public transit.

Getting into DC from National by subway is a breeze. It basically took us as long to walk from the gate to the metro as it did to take the six stops across the Potomac. Driving couldn’t have been faster.

I know National is closer to the heart of things here in Washington than Pearson is to downtown Toronto. Certainly Dulles Airport isn’t as transit friendly. But no major city should be without a rail link to its airport.

YellowLineDC

Toronto is finally getting there with the Union to Pearson line next year. (Fingers crossed!) I’ll leave the matter of electrification for another discussion. But if we were really being bold in Toronto, we’d be working on connecting to Pearson with the Eglinton crosstown and the Finch LRT. So everyone could make their way directly to the airport by public transit along north, south and central corridors.

beltwayly submitted by Cityslikr

 


Be D.Ceeing You Later

May 24, 2014

Off to the U.S. capital for a week.

washingtondc

Ahhhh, Washington.

Along with Chicago, it is my favourite American city. That’s no slight against New York or San Francisco or New Orleans. Fine destinations, all of them. But I rarely turn down an opportunity to travel to Washington.

Why is that, I’ve been asked. What’s so great about Washington? Well, because it’s only an hour or so from Camden Yards, my favourite baseball park.

Actually, it’s a fair question and one I’m going to try track down the answers for while I’m down there. Ideally, I’ll be delivering up short bursts of D.C. enthusiasm throughout the week. Fingers crossed. There’s always the possibility I could find myself otherwise engaged passing the time at the FDR Memorial, having a drink on the roof of the Kennedy Centre, hanging out with the orangutans at the Zoo, eating crab cakes somewhere in Georgetown…

camdenyards

stars and stripely submitted by Cityslikr


Roads To Nowhere

May 23, 2014

Although never far from the surface, if you ever want to scratch open the drivers’ sense of entitlement, entitledask one How’s it going? during their favourite time of the year, construction season.

2014 is turning out to be doozy.

“This is not how you run a city,” mayoral candidate and noted transportation expert John Tory pronounced in the wake of the news there’d be concurrent construction on both the Gardiner Expressway and Lake Shore Boulevard. “Torontonians shouldn’t be forced to arrive late for work because of the lack of thought or planning by city officials. Sadly, the situation on our major roads is now once again a world-class mess.”

Ahh, there it is. Always with the world-class, one way or another. And by Torontonians, Mr. Tory means car-driving Torontonians of course.outrageous

“When we should have been planning ahead and making calculated decisions to address congestion, this administration has provided poor judgment by compounding gridlock on our roads,” another mayoral candidate and one with some actual municipal governance under her belt, Councillor Karen Stintz said. “We have a responsibility to ensure residents have options to move in and out of the city. Today, we have created roadblocks.”

They do, Councillor Stintz. It’s called getting out of their cars and using public transit.

Even noted cyclist and alleged car hater, Olivia Chow (also running for mayor) got in on the indignant act. “My traffic plan says you can’t shut a street (Lake Shore) if used to avoid one (Gardiner) under construction,” Ms. Chow stated on the Twitter.

With everyone jumping on the city staff kicking bandwagon over this, obviously somebody screwed up, somebody fell asleep at the switch. The mistake is so glaring, there’s no way anyone who was paying any attention would’ve allowed it to happen. This requires a strongly worded admonishment.

“Believe it or not, I have confirmed that the office running the smaller Lakeshore job did not communicate with the office running the bigger Gardiner job, overreactionwhich is simply unreal,” John Tory said in his e-mail blast blast. “As mayor I will ensure this will never be repeated.”

Simply unreal.

Or “completely untrue”, depending on whom you ask.

“I’m at the table for both of these,” said General Manager of Transportation Services, Stephen Buckley. “However, the reality is we needed to get the Gardiner work going, and we needed to get the Lake Shore work done. Folks want the infrastructure to be upgraded and put in good condition. Unfortunately these are both in the same location.”

Folks want their infrastructure upgraded, and want it upgraded at their convenience.

Mr. Buckley went on to say that, “The two specific teams carrying out the Gardiner and Lake Shore work were fully aware of what was going on and meeting regularly.”

Between the long harsh winter just past and the upcoming PanAm Games next summer, the city is obviously facing something of a construction crunch. Given there’s going to be work on the Gardiner well into the next decade, chances are, more overlaps in our future. roadconstructionThat just comes with aging infrastructure over-burdened by usage.

Only in car commercials are our roads ever open and maintenance free.

“This drives people crazy,” said Public Works and Infrastructure Chair and automobile nut, Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong, “it drives me crazy and hopefully an important lesson has been learned and will be applied.”

And what lesson would that be, councillor?

“Some disruption with the daytime Lake Shore work,” suggests Mr. Buckley who is being paid to manage road work. Much of the work is being done overnight. No lanes would be closed going in the direction of rush hour traffic. The city, he said, is keeping an eye on the situation. outofmywaySo far, during the day, delays on Lake Shore were “about a minute long.”

“This is probably the worst of it, we’re not seeing significant delays,” Mr. Buckley claims.

Insignificant delays and maximum outrage.

Stirring up driver resentment is a potent political tactic. Just ask Rob Ford. War. On. The. Car.

It feeds into that ingrained sense of privilege that once you’re behind the wheel of your automobile, nothing and no one should obstruct your ease of movement between point A and point B. I pay my taxes, dammit! I shouldn’t be inconvenienced.

The thing is, hundreds of thousands of other drivers believe the exact same thing at the exact same time of day, every day. As that old saying goes, you’re not stuck in traffic, you are traffic.

The only way we’re going to actually address the soul-sucking, business-hampering congestion that is plaguing us now is to confront the entitlement of the car driver head-on. We cannot road build our way out of this. punchyourselfThe private automobile is the least efficient and least cost-effective way to move people and goods around this region. Leadership means acknowledging that and offering up real alternatives.

What we’re getting right now is craven opportunism and political posturing. A supreme silly season during peak construction season.

under constructionally submitted by Cityslikr


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